Because I am a coach,
I have a lot of conversations about big questions.

What should I do with my life?
Why am I here?
How can I contribute to the planet?
Like I said, big questions.

I am also asked other questions too.

How can I make more money?
How can I “get over” this thing that happened?
How can I make it work with someone I love and kinda hate right now?
How can I find my tribe and attract people to my business?
How can I have life balance and still get get all the stuff I need to get done?

And so many more.
Good questions.  Tough questions.  Life questions.
 I love them all.

Because at the heart of questions is some kind of problem.
And I like solving problems.
Not Suduko or New York Times crossword type of problems.
I am terrible at those.
But give me a people problem and you have my attention.
It’s my thing.
And I am grateful for knowing it’s my thing because this habit of mine to solve people problems
has afforded me the most beautiful conversations,
been witness to more transformations
and created a business that I am proud of.
It has allowed me to feel like I contribute (even a little) to the world I inhabit.

Which is why I loved watching Matt Damon;s recent MIT commencement speech.
I love watching these kind of speeches because it is a great honour to be asked to give them
and the people delivering said speeches tend to put a bit of thought into them.

While I liked many things about Matt’s speech, my favourite line is where he share some life-altering advice given to him by Bill Clinton.  The advice?

“Turn toward the problems you see”.

So simple.  So powerful.
Isn’t this what we are all trying to do at some level?

With our businesses?
With our resources?
With our time?

Just solve problems out there.

So this is me just reminding you to keep doing good work out there
because we haven’t figured everything out yet.

The world needs consciousness and commitment to good work
because not all problems have solutions.
Yet.

So find your thing.  
Maybe it is a big global thing.
Maybe not.
Maybe it’s a paid thing.
Maybe not.
But find your thing.
Get involved.

Because at the heart of all great work is just a person,
who turned toward a problem they saw,
and did something about it.

To doing your thing,
Beth

Ps
If you want to watch the commencement speech, go here:
http://news.mit.edu/2016/matt-damon-commencement-address-0603#.V1RgJTxecL8.facebook

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